Bojack Horseman the best you can get

December 26, 2016


*spoiler alert - this is going to be a full fan-boy review.

 

 

 

 

 

"A humanoid horse, BoJack Horseman -- lost in a sea of self-loathing and booze -- decides it's time for a comeback. Once the star of a '90s sitcom, in which he was the adoptive father of three orphaned kids (two girls and a boy). The show was the hottest thing around, then suddenly, was canceled. Now 18 years later, BoJack wants to regain his dignity. With the aid of a human sidekick and a feline ex-girlfriend who is his agent, he sets out to make it happen. But Hollywood is vastly different from those days, and getting used to stuff like Twitter may take some time. This first animated series from Netflix -- with plenty of references to sex, drugs and alcohol -- is not for the little ones."*

 

 

 

 

Where do I start? where? 
alright, I won't.
I mean, I'm going to jump right away to the point where I'm telling you "watch it."
Just - WATCH IT. Do it. 
I know, I should write a compelling review, fully analyzing the characters and their background and who they represent in this society and the thematics they.. and bla bla bla, you know.
Truth is, Bojack the Horseman is arguably the wittiest, smartest, funniest and deeply philosophically sad cartoon tv-series I've watched in ages.

And I'm all about philosophical nihilism, after all. 
I know, it's a lot to digest, so let me explain better.
It starts as something supposedly entertainingly silly (I was expecting a modernized version of MTV  Daria or South Park mixed up with some  MacFarlane-like irony from American Dad - this time with Breaking Bad actor Aaron Paul playing [dubbing] the stoned, lazy, homeless supporting character) and before you realize, boom: it's turned in a deep, scary existentialist metaphor of contemporary life, swinging between success and lack of meaning, losing your own self in the memory of what it used to be while everything else falls apart.

Life slips away as Hollywood becomes Hollywoo and Bojack sees his Oscar statuette sliding away and grows grimmer and grimmer and the last joke is eventually on us. 

Because you see- as much as we're all bent on criticizing and laughing at what we recognize as crooked and rotten - sure we won't move an inch to change it. And in my opinion, Bojack ultimately is all about the inability and total lack of resolution of human beings when it comes to make a change.

Even if that means only accepting - that change.  

 

 

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Bojack Horseman the best you can get

December 26, 2016

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